Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween Driving Safety Tips Keeping kids & pets safe during Halloween  Driving on Halloween requires an extra measure of awareness and caution because very young kids to teens who are excited, distracted, and hard to see fearlessly take to the streets, which are shared by vehicles.  Be sure to slow down in residential areas and drive below the speed limit, in order to look for kids who may not see you or pay attention to you. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)  states that kids are four times more likely to be hit by a car on Halloween, than on any other day of the year. The most dangerous time for drivers and children is between 4 PM to 8 PM, when the majority of children are out trick-or-treating. For these four hours one day a year, please put down your cell phone and give the road your full attention and…

Forms of Domestic Abuse: It’s Not Just Physical

Forms of Domestic Abuse: It’s Not Just Physical Often, when people think of domestic abuse, they think of physical abuse, and for this reason, victims of other equally traumatic and destructive forms of domestic abuse often don’t seek help. It’s important to identify the types of domestic abuse to know where to get help for domestic violence, and to be aware of the many resources for domestic abuse and domestic violence victims. Over 33% of women and 25% of men in the United States have experienced some form of domestic violence. It is critical that domestic abuse victims understand: You are NOT alone. It is NEVER your fault. You are NEVER to blame for your partner’s behavior. You do NOT deserve the abuse. There ARE people and organizations waiting to help you. There ARE safe, effective resources to help you escape from or transition away from the abuse. Your partner…

Cyber Bullying Statistics & Cyber Bullying Facts

Cyber Bullying Statistics Statistics suggest that 40 to 50% of teens have been victims of cyberbullying. To effectively prevent and combat this lethal form of bullying, you must understand how it works. There are two broad and overlapping categories of cyberbullying: “Direct” and “Proxy.” Direct cyberbullying happens when cyberbullies directly attack the victim via texts, email, or posts on their own social media. For example, cyberbullies might send a death-threat instant message, send unauthorized pictures of the victim to hundreds or thousands of people, or post degrading information about the victim on the cyberbully’s Facebook page. Proxy cyberbullying involves an unwitting (most of the time) third party whom cyberbullies set up to do the damage for them. For example, cyberbullies might copy information and pictures from the victim’s Instagram or Facebook account and upload the information and photos to a Web site that traffics children and teens. The traffickers and…