What is the MRSA Infection?

Let's Talk About the MRSA Infection In our last blog, we discussed the top infectious diseases, how they spread, and how you can prevent contamination. In this blog, we’ll answer a question we’re asked on a daily basis: What is the MRSA infection? We’ll focus on this very common infectious disease, which is caused by a bacterium that has become resistant to most of the antibiotics that previously destroy it. It can, therefore, be a very deadly disease. MRSA is a staph infection. Its name describes its dangerous resistance to antibiotics: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. “Methicillin” refers to the primary antibiotic that was used to destroy the bacteria and to which the bacteria have become immune. “Resistant” describes why the bacteria are so dangerous—they resist the most common and once-effective antibiotic that was used to destroy the bacteria. “Staphylococcus aureus,” referred to as “Staph,” is a group of very common and…

The Top Infectious Diseases

The Top Infectious Diseases That Kill People Do You Know What Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Measures Can Protect You? Infectious diseases are THE leading cause of death in children and one of the leading causes of death in adults, according to the Center for Strategic International Studies. Infectious diseases come from microscopic organisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites that are passed from one person to another. In humans, the primary microbes that cause disease are bacteria and viruses. Many bacteria can be killed with antibiotics and antibacterial cleaning agents. Hence, the diseases these bacteria cause can be cured. Increasingly, however, bacteria have become more lethal because they are developing resistance to antibiotics, like the infamous MRSA bacteria. Resistance comes from the overuse of antibiotics and antibacterial cleaning agents, which are the direct causes of “superbugs” like the dangerous MRSA bacteria. Examples of infectious diseases caused by bacteria are tuberculosis…

Biohazard Waste Pick Up

Biohazard Waste Pick Up: What Happens to That Blood-Soaked Mattress Removed from a Crime Scene? After biohazard waste pick up job is completed, have you ever wondered where the contaminated objects end up? Traditionally, biohazardous waste is burned by large facilities that operate incinerators with modern pollution control equipment on smokestacks to minimize the impact of dangerous toxins escaping into the environment, and the leftover ash is then sent to landfills. Incinerating biohazardous waste effectively kills the pathogens, but it has its risks. Even though the incineration process done by trained professionals at medical facilities neutralizes potentially lethal agents, some toxins still find their ways into our water and air. Today, much biohazardous waste is chemically decontaminated, irradiated, or autoclaved, which is sterilization with steam. Then, after decontamination, the biohazardous waste is taken to landfills. Today, there are over a hundred different technologies used in place of incineration to decontaminate…