What Are the Health Risks of Cleaning up a Death Scene?

The death of a loved one is never an easy process. Even under the best of circumstances, the concerns and emotions that death causes can be difficult to work through. It is extremely important to understand that cleaning up the remains after a loved one’s passing can be a complicated and risky affair. In instances of unattended death such as situations where someone passed away alone or has been the victim of a violent crime, only those skilled in dealing with biohazards are qualified to take on the death cleanup process. Why is biohazard cleanup necessary? Unfortunately, what remains at the scene of a death is not often neat. This is the case even when someone has simply quietly stopped breathing in their own bed. Nature quickly takes over. Once the finely-tuned mechanisms of a living body stop working, the next step in the natural order occurs. Waste products are…

Biohazardous and Infectious Disease Cleanup Processes: What to Know

The need for biohazardous and infectious disease cleanup isn’t a topic that comes up for most people every day. But when you do need to know how to respond, it’s often an emergency—and not everyone can respond as well under trying circumstances as compared to when they are prepared or have easy access to information about what to do. In this post, we share the information you need on what to do when biohazard cleanup or infectious disease cleanup is needed, including: The definition of biohazard cleanup The definition of infectious disease cleanup How NOT to handle these types of situations How to handle blood cleanup/bodily fluid cleanup How to clean up after an unattended death occurs How to manage infectious disease cleanup Commercial cleanup Choosing a professional cleaning company If you have questions about this type of professional cleaning for your home or business, you can contact us online.…

The Risks of Pathogens at Houston Crime Scenes

When your Houston home or business has become a crime scene or death scene, restoring it to a safe, clean condition is our highest priority. This often involves eliminating the threat posed by bloodborne pathogens, which can remain at the scene long after the event. The health risks of pathogens at crime scenes are very serious, and require the services of trained professionals who know how to safely remediate biohazards. Types of pathogens that may be present at crime scenes. Bloodborne pathogens are more common than you may think, and some people do not know they are carriers. Pathogens that may be present at a Houston crime scene include, but are not limited to: Hepatitis B and hepatitis C: According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), hepatitis is most often caused by a virus. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections can range from a mild illness to a severe…